English (Book Chapters)

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  • Publication
    Introduction: Starting a Conversation
    (Cúirt International Festival of Literature and NUI Galway, 2022) de Buyl, Sasha; Reid, Lindsay Ann; Irish Research Council; National University of Ireland, Galway; Cúirt International Festival of Literature; Irish Writers Centre; Speaking Volumes Live Literature Productions
    Breaking Ground Ireland is the first publication of its kind: it highlights writers and illustrators from ethnic minority backgrounds in Ireland, including those from Irish Traveller backgrounds. Based on Breaking Ground, an original concept and project by London-based organisation Speaking Volumes, this brochure is brought to you by Lindsay Ann Reid of NUI Galway and Sasha de Buyl of Cúirt International Festival of Literature, with mentorship from Speaking Volumes, support from the Irish Writers Centre and funding from the Irish Research Council.
  • Publication
    The Longue durée of Brexit: Politics, literature and the British past
    (Brill, 2021-05-20) Carey, Daniel
    The complex proposition posed by Brexit challenges us to reinvestigate British reflections on identity from an historical point of view. This contribution considers a range of precedents, beginning with the English Reformation before considering questions of sovereignty, separation, immigration and exceptionalism in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The claim is not that history straightforwardly facilitates an understanding of the fissures associated with Brexit, but rather that the present is ironised as much as it is explained by the past. We have much to learn not just from history but from works of poetry, fiction and drama that engage with historical concerns of identity and politics. The contribution looks first at Defoe’s poem The True-Born Englishman (1701) and aspects of Robinson Crusoe (1719), with their mixed-conceptions of identity, followed by attention to Shakespeare’s Richard II, Henry V, and the plot twists of Cymbeline, a romance predicated on separation from Roman authority. The contribution concludes with Churchill and the contradictions in British attitudes to Europe inherited by Theresa May and Boris Johnson, which promise to endure as the UK redefines its relationship to Ireland and Continental Europe.
  • Publication
    What’s in a blush? Constellating Aeneid 12.64–9 and Amores 2.5.33–40 in Spenser’s Legend of Chastity
    (De Gruyter, 2020-09-07) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    The brief Ovidian career of Isabella Whitney: From Heroidean to Tristian complaint
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    Calling attention to the Ovidian contours of Isabella Whitney s cursus litterarum, this essay reconsiders the literary heritage of the personae she adopts in The Copy of a Letter (c. 1566) and A Sweet Nosgay (1573). Existing analyses of Whitney s Ovidianism have tended to emphasize her debts to the female-voiced epistles of the Heroides while simultaneously overlooking profound intertextual connections between A Sweet Nosgay and Ovid s exilic writings. In contrast, this essay argues that the outlines of a self-consciously classical career trajectory (its stages demarcated by Whitney s subtle aesthetic shift from Heroidean amatory complaint to Tristian exile complaint) can be detected when The Copy of a Letter and A Sweet Nosgay are read contiguously.
  • Publication
    "The argument to the whole discourse" and other etiological tales in Turberville's epitaphes, epigrams, songs and sonets
    (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Arizona State University (ACMRS), 2020-01-31) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Writing before 1700
    (Cambridge University Press, 2018-08) Coolahan, Marie-Louise
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Nuns writing: Translation, textual mobility and transnational networks
    (Cambridge University Press, 2018-01) Coolahan, Marie-Louise; European Research Council; Seventh Framework Programme
    Post-Reformation Catholic religious orders provided women with privileged, multi-layered spaces for authorship, readership, and textual transmission. Exile and travel were imperative for British and Irish women religious, exposing them to cross-cultural encounters and international influences. Convent membership nurtured as co-extensive a set of identities – national and transnational, individual and communal – that, in other contexts, were perceived as conflicting. The kinds of writing produced in these convents ranged from obituary and chronicle history to religious rules and devotional translations. They were required for the female religious community; they addressed, documented, and shaped that female readership. But these texts also participated in the Counter-Reformation effort and sustained interest beyond their initial, female audience. The religious orders, with their pan-European reach, functioned as transnational networks for the circulation of women’s writings. This wider transmission and reception illuminates questions relating to gender and authorial credit – itself a complex topic when convent identity prizes the collective and collaborative over individual authorship or attribution. This chapter grounds its discussion of these issues in the devotional and life writings associated with Mary Ward and Lucy Knatchbull, the translations made by English and Irish Poor Clares, and Susan Hawley’s account of the Sepulchrine convent at Liège.
  • Publication
    Louise Hollandine and the Art of Arachnean Critique
    (Amsterdam University Press, 2019-07-22) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    Louise Hollandine was an artist and student of internationally renowned Dutch painter Gerard van Honthorst. Though relatively few works now survive that can be authoritatively ascribed to her, Louise Hollandine s artistic reputation is flatteringly memorialized in Richard Lovelace s seldom-remarked poem Princesse Löysa Drawing. Princesse Löysa Drawing reworks in surprising and nuanced ways the celebrated weaving contest between Arachne and Minerva from Book 6 of Ovid's Metamorphoses. After briefly establishing the broader social contexts in which both this Princess Palatine and Lovelace operated, this chapter presents a sustained literary analysis of Princesse Löysa Drawing, exploring both its intertextual, literary connections with Metamorphoses 6 and its relation to two Ovidian portraits historiés by Louise Hollandine, The Daughters of Cecrops and Vertumnus and Pomona.
  • Publication
    To the tune of "Queen Dido": The spectropoetics of early modern English balladry
    (2017-04-12) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Monstrosity, monument and multiplication: The lamenting Lady Margaret of Henneberg (and her 365 children) in Early Modern England
    (Cambria Press, 2014-08-28) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    Extraordinary and fantastical stories about Margaret of Henneberg, a cursed thirteenth-century Countess who had allegedly birthed 365 infants in one day, were popular with early modern English audiences. A range of printed sources from the early seventeenth century elaborate on the retributive nature of the haughty Dutch Countess’ reproductive destiny and indicate that the medieval woman’s supposed resting place in Loosduinen had even become a real life tourist attraction for curious British travelers of the era. As numerous early modern eyewitness accounts attest, in this village just outside The Hague one could find material evidence supposedly confirming the various tales about Countess Margaret and her monstrous brood of multiples. As it was developed and embellished in various early modern English versions, Countess Margaret’s story consistently displayed an ambivalence towards multiples and multiplication and also gave prominence to the idea that monumentality could serve as an indicator of credibility. A sustained exploration of how these issues of multiplication and monument inform a relevant c. 1620 ballad entitled “The Lamenting Lady” reveal a potent convergence of form and content: the broadside’s first-person lyrics about Countess Margaret’s hyperfertile reproductive plight simultaneously speak to the conditions under which “The Lamenting Lady” and other early modern ballads were historically disseminated and consumed.
  • Publication
    Unsoiled soil and "Fleshly Slime": Representations of reproduction in Spenser's Legend of Chastity
    (Duquesne University Press, 2017) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Thanhouser's ‘Fierce Abridgement’ of Cymbeline
    (Cambridge University Press, 2017-06) Reid, Lindsay Ann
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Those bloody trees: the affectivity of Christ
    (Ashgate, 2015) McCormack, Frances; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    'And like the sea God was silent': Multivalent water imagery in Silence
    (Bloomsbury, 2015-02-26) McCormack, Frances; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    J.S. LeFanu, Gothic, and the Irish Periodical
    (Palgrave, 2014) Tilley, Elizabeth; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Irish political cartoons and the New Journalism
    (Palgrave, 2014) Tilley, Elizabeth; |~|
    [No Abstract available]
  • Publication
    Periodicals
    (Oxford University Press, 2011) Tilley, Elizabeth; |~|
    No abstract available