Gaeilge (Book Chapters)

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  • Publication
    'Do Sheans': Children's agency in integrating Scottish Gaelic and Irish into 'Happy Families'
    (Cló Léann na Gaeilge, 2023-03-16) Smith-Christmas, Cassie
    [No abstract]
  • Publication
    The cult of St Moling and Buile Shuibhne
    (Irish Texts Society / Cumann na Scríbheann nGaedhilge, 2013) Ní Dhonnchadha, Máirín; Carey, John
    [No abstract aviailable]
  • Publication
    The Prull narrative in Sanas Cormaic
    (Celtic Studies Publications, 2004) Ní Dhonnchadha, Máirín
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Travellers and settled folk: Women, honour and shame in medieval Ireland
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) Ní Dhonnchadha, Máirín
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Conceptualising successful intergenerational transmission in terms of saibhreas: Family language support in the Corca Dhuibhne Gaeltacht
    (Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2022-04-14) Smith-Christmas, Cassie; Ruiséal, Orlaith
    This chapter proposes the saibhreas model (‘richness’ in Irish) as a means to explore caregivers’ goals in intergenerational language transmission. The chapter argues that although the field of Family Language Policy (‘FLP’) has contributed much to elucidating the intricacies of language use in the family, we as FLP researchers have not sufficiently interrogated the concept ‘intergenerational language transmission’. Our aim in this chapter therefore is to provide a means to conceptualise ‘success’ in intergenerational transmission in a way which privileges the dynamic and emotional aspects of language use, in addition to the linguistic dimensions. Conceived through work with Tús Maith, the complementary family language support programme in the Corca Dhuibhne Gaeltacht in Ireland, we argue that caregivers’ main aim is for their child to achieve saibhreas’ (‘richness’) in their language use, which in turn can be broken down into three intersecting components: competent language use; local language use; and embodied language use.
  • Publication
    11 Child agency and home language maintenance
    (De Grouton Mouton, 2020) Smith-Christmas, Cassie
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    New speakers of Irish and identities
    (Routledge, 2020-03-03) O’Rourke, Bernadette; Walsh, John
    This chapter examines the links between the Irish language and identity in the discourses of new speakers. Despite the strong historical association of Irish with national ethnocultural identity, the chapter identifies a wider range of identity constellations to which new speakers adhere. These include linguistic identities based primarily on Irish or English, or standard language versus dialect. Some participants articulate ambiguous, mixed or qualified linguistic identities. The chapter concludes with an analysis of the intersection between linguistic and sexual identities.
  • Publication
    The place-names of Co. Roscommon
    (Geography Publications, 2018) Ó hAisibéil, Liam
    Roscommon is one of five counties comprising the province of Connacht, bounded to the west by the counties of Galway and Mayo, by Sligo and Leitrim at all points to the north, and by Leitrim, Longford, Westmeath to the east, and counties Offaly and Galway to the south. Around two thirds of the boundaries of Roscommon are defined by two significant rivers, namely the River Shannon to the east, and the River Suck which forms the southern and south-western boundaries of the county, formally established in the late-sixteenth century. Extensive tracts of peat, moorland, and areas of upland comprise its western and northern boundaries. Writing in 1832, the topographical writer Isaac Weld, describes the geographical character of the county as follows: ‘The mountains on the borders of Lough Allen, the Curlew mountains in the same district, the great sand-stone ridge of Slievebawn, extending through the baronies of Ballintobber and Roscommon, and Slievealuyn in the west, afford sure indications that the surface of the county is not devoid of inequality and variety. Neither is it merely in the vicinity of the mountains that the surface is broken; but in various parts it is agreeably undulated with hill and dale. Nevertheless, considerable tracts of flat ground intervene likewise, through which dull and sleepy rivers wind their sluggish course, frequently overflowing their sedgy banks and flooding the country to a considerable extent on either side. Some of the larger bogs also present flat surfaces of considerable extent, whilst others are diversified with all the inequalities of the hills upon which they repose. Along the river Suck, and likewise on the Shannon, there are extensive tracts of flat alluvial soil, and also vast plains of bog’.1 The physical geography of the county as described above is echoed in its place-names, where the names of natural features, evidenced in townland names, indicate a landscape characterised by riverside meadows, extensive patches of peat and moorland, tree-covered drumlins, and rich grazing lands which are situated, for the most part, atop limestone plateaus through the geographic centre of the county.
  • Publication
    Dragging up the past: subversive performance of gender and sexual identities in traditional and contemporary Irish culture
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) Woods, Jeannine
    This chapter places contemporary drag performance in Ireland within a historical context of dissident, subversive elements of Irish popular culture. The practice of drag, as a performative and political strategy with the potential to disrupt and destabilise fixed gender dichotomies and heteronormative hierarchies of identity, is an international phenomenon associated with the LGBT movement. Drag performance among the LGBT movement in Ireland as explored here serves as a performative practice that queers dominant and intersecting discourses on gender, sexuality and national identity; it also reinflects Bakhtin’s conception of the carnivalesque in a critical engagement with the field of the political. As a practice that draws both on the queer and the carnivalesque, critical drag performance in Ireland both engages with local, national and international cultural politics and also resonates with aspects of traditional Irish popular culture, notably in the context of traditional wake games.
  • Publication
    Cailís mo chuid fola/ the chalice of my blood: stigmatized female identity in Celia de Fréine’s Fiacha Fola
    (Coimbra: Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra/Coimbra University Press, 2017) Ó Laoire, Lillis
    Discussion of Celia de Fréine's poetry collection 'Fiacha Fola' (2005) about the Hepatitis C scandal
  • Publication
    Literature and learning in early medieval Meath
    (Geography Publications, 2015) Downey, Clodagh
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Murder in a meadow: Environmental and cultural extinction in Cathal Ó Searcaigh's "Scrúdú Coinsiasa Roimh Dhul Chun Suain"
    (Brill, 2017-11) Ó Laoire, Lillis; |~|
    An ecocritical reading of a poem by Cathal Ó Searcaigh
  • Publication
    Beochan an bhéaloidis: an scannánaíocht, foirm na beochana agus an traidisiún béil
    (Leabhair Comhair, 2016) Woods, Jeannine; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Trans-formations of gendered identities in Ireland
    (Palgrave, 2014) Woods, Jeannine
    Since the early 1990s, non-heteronormative masculinities have gained a certain degree of acceptance in Irish society. The years preceding and following the decriminalistaion of homosexuality in 1993 saw an increase in the representation of homosexual identities in Ireland and a concomitant questioning of dominant definitions of Irish masculinity. Representations of trans identities and characters constitute a significant part of those questionings, trans identities prompting and facilitating a rethinking of fixed categories both of gender and of national identity, given the gendering of national(ist) discourse and its historical relationship to Catholic teaching on sexuality and sexual identity in Ireland. Representations of trans figures in an Irish context feature most notably in Neil Jordan s 1993 film The Crying Game and in Pat McCabe s 1998 novel Breakfast on Pluto and in its later cinematic adaptation by Jordan. Both of these works, which have received a good deal of critical attention, are explored here vis-à-vis their critical explorations of gender and sexual ambiguities in the context of Irish identity. The work of Jordan and McCabe aside, representations and performances of trans identities and characters in Ireland have been primarily located within theatrical and cabaret drag performances produced within the gay community. While there can be distinctions between the articulation of trans identities and the practice of drag, both have the potential to disrupt and destabilise fixed gender dichotomies and to raise questions regarding heteronormative hierarchies of identity. This essaym examines the practice of drag, particularly within the Alternative Miss Ireland Contest, as both performative and political strategy, examining whether the performance of drag in can be seen to critically intervene in discourses on gender, sexuality and national identity.
  • Publication
    Ó chroí amach: ceist na haéistéitice in amhránaíocht na Gaeilge
    (Cló Iar-Chonnacht, 2002) Ó Laoire, Lillis; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Solas ar na Dumhchannaí: Aistí i gcuimhne ar Mhuiris Ó Meara
    (LeabhairCOMHAR, 2016) Ó Laoire, Lillis; |~|
    Traces the emergence of 'Amhrán Mhaínse' as a major musical symbol of Gaeltacht identity from the 1950s onward.
  • Publication
    Gabriel Rosenstock (*1949):"The Rejection of the Early Morning Dew"
    (Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2014) Ní Mhunghaile, Lesa; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    The Irish language in County Meath, 1700-1900
    (Geography Publications, 2015-12) Ní Mhunghaile, Lesa; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Ossian and the Gaelic World
    (Scottish Literature International, 2017) Ní Mhunghaile, Lesa; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    An teanga agus oidhreacht na namhrán i dToraigh
    (Éigse Cholm Cille, 2016) Ó Laoire, Lillis; |~|1267880|~|
    A discussion of the role of performance, especially song in the maintenance of identity and culture in Tory Island with a focus on two song texts.