History (Book Chapters)

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  • Publication
    Not Forgotten: Thady Lee (1623-1651/2) and the Irish Vincentians
    (Veritas Publications, 2022-06-30) Forrestal, Alison
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    From generation to generation: World War II narratives in transition
    (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021-11-04) Healy, Róisín; Barry, Gearóid
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Towards an interconnected history of World War I: Europe and beyond
    (Brill, 2016) Barry, Gearóid; Dal Lago, Enrico; Healy, Róisín
    In recent years, the historiography of World War I has undergone a very significant transformation in terms of its geographical scope and thematic reach. While most studies of World War I up to the 1990s focused on national experiences, a generation of new scholars subsequently began analyzing the War in comparative perspective across Europe and the world.1 The following decade saw the emergence of a global approach to First World War studies, pioneered by Hew Strachan and Michael Neiberg and developed in a range of recent reference works.2 Jay Winter has identified a significant increase in studies of the War as a transnational phenomenon, defined by Ian Tyrell as an emphasis on “the movement of peoples, ideas, technologies, and institutions across the border.”3 Due to both the transnational training of World War I historians and the collapse of political and ideological dichotomies with the end of the Cold War, a transnational view has emerged in opposition to an international approach which privileges the diplomatic history of the War.4
  • Publication
    Investigating colonialism within Europe
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) Healy, Róisín; Dal Lago, Enrico
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Globalising the Easter Rising: 1916 and the challenge to empires
    (Routledge, 2017-11-16) Dal Lago, Enrico; Healy, Róisín; Barry, Gearóid
    The year 1916 has recently been identified as “a tipping point for the intensification of protests, riots, uprisings and even revolutions.”1 Many of these constituted a challenge to the international pre-war order of empires and thus collectively represent a global anti-imperial moment, which was the revolutionary counterpart to the later diplomatic attempt to construct a new world order in the so-called Wilsonian moment.2 As Keith Jeffery has pointed out, “The Easter Rising in Ireland … was far from being the only rebellion against imperial rule during 1916.”3 The Rising was an attack, in late April 1916, on British rule by a group of 1,000 committed revolutionaries, who seized key strategic positions in Dublin and other parts of Ireland, but were defeated by 20,000 British forces. The Rising was marked by the destruction of the city centre and the deaths of over 400 civilians. It was followed by the arrest of the combatants and thousands of alleged sympathisers across the country, the execution of fifteen of its leaders for treason after secret courts martial and the public trial and hanging of the famous humanitarian turned revolutionary Roger Casement in London in August 1916.4
  • Publication
    From travel to mobility: Perspectives on journeys in the Russian, Central and East European past
    (Routledge, 2019-03-28) Healy, Róisín
    This chapter introduces the “new mobilities paradigm” and argues for its application to the modern history of Russia, central and east Europe. It charts the emergence of this approach in the context of the more established fields of travel literature studies, migration history, and the history of tourism, but notes that the “new mobilities paradigm” has not yet had much impact on the historiography of Russia, central and east Europe. It is critical of the emphasis on Orientalist views of the region and claims that these have overestimated western hostility to the region and neglected the mobility of the region’s inhabitants. This chapter further suggests that an assumption of tight state control of movement in Russia has led to a neglect of many types of journeys within the region. It calls for historians to abandon the customary distinctions they have traditionally applied to journeys, based on purpose, duration or level of choice, and instead explore commonalities between them. Finally, it explains the specific contribution to the understanding of mobility of the twelve case studies included in the volume, which range from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries.
  • Publication
    ‘Found in a “dying” condition’: nurse-children in Ireland, 1872–1952
    (Institute of Historical Research, 2012-09) Buckley, Sarah-Anne
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Family and power: Incest and Ireland, 1880-1950
    (Irish Academic Press, 2011-06-17) Buckley, Sarah-Anne
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Parenting, poverty and the NSPCC in Ireland, 1889–1939
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) Buckley, Sarah-Anne
    This chapter addresses a number of key questions surrounding parenting, poverty and the state in Ireland from 1889 to 1939.1 Concentrating on the period from the opening of the first Irish branch of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) to the beginning of the Second World War, it highlights international concerns involving child protection, parenting, and the state, as well as specific Irish anxieties surrounding class, gender, emigration, sexuality and the family. This was an era in which parenting was increasingly seen as national duty, and, as Harry Hendrick has asserted in a broader history of child welfare and the NSPCC in Britain, ‘“Civilised” parenting, especially by the Irish and the poor, was testimony to progress.
  • Publication
    Childhood since 1740
    (Cambridge University Press, 2017-04) Buckley, Sarah-Anne; O'Riordan, Susannah
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    'No Good Days But The Present Ones?' Readers' Letters to Woman's Way 1963-69
    (Lilliput Press, 2015) Clear, Caitriona; |~|1267873|~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    O’Brien, Terence Albert [1600-1651]
    (Oxford University Press, 2004) Forrestal, Alison; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    MacGeoghegan, Roche (1580–1644)
    (Oxford University Press, 2004) Forrestal, Alison; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    A "global nervous system": The rise and rise of European humanitarian NGOs
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) O'Sullivan, Kevin; |~|6201984|~|1289755|~|
    Going a step beyond the guiding principle of Amnesty International and the human rights movement that individuals could change the policies of foreign governments humanitarian NGOs emphasised the power of people-to-people interaction. In the process they contributed to a re-alignment of international relations, towards a more globalised concept of international action. Their activities became so prominent or at least their brands were so visible that the 1980s won the moniker the NGO decade , in recognition of their lasting impact on the aid industry. But why did the forty years after the end of the Second World War provide such fertile ground for the emergence of a European humanitarian NGO sector? And what role did states play in shaping non-governmental action? To answer these questions, this chapter combines an analysis of global currents of change with evidence from two national case studies: Britain and Ireland. It argues that the role of states and inter-governmental organisations in shaping the fortunes of NGOs implies that the emergence of the international humanitarian sector was not the simple, organic, bottom-up, process that is sometimes described. Instead, those who set the international agenda also largely dictated its terms of engagement. Only by appreciating the enduring importance of the state can we begin to unpack the complex relationships that emerged between actors at all levels of the international system in the second half of the twentieth century.
  • Publication
    Biafra's legacy: NGO humanitarianism and the Nigerian civil war
    (Overseas Development Institute, 2016-10) O'Sullivan, Kevin; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    The Church in the Tridentine and Early Modern Eras
    (Routledge, 2008) Forrestal, Alison; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    The Catholic reformation in seventeenth-century Ireland: Vincent de Paul's Missionaries in Munster
    (Veritas, 2012) Forrestal, Alison; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Catholic missionaries in a territory of Reunion: The French Crown and the Congregation of the Mission in Sedan, 1642-57
    (Wehrhahn, 2013) Forrestal, Alison; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Re-thinking Missionary Catholicism for the Early Modern Era
    (Brill, 2016-09) Forrestal, Alison; Smith, Seán; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Vincent de Paul: The making of a Catholic Dévot
    (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009) Forrestal, Alison; |~|
    [No abstract available]