Mechanical Engineering (Reports)

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  • Publication
    A two and three-dimensional CFD investigation into performance prediction and wake characterisation of a vertical axis turbine
    (AIP Publishing, 2018-05-24) Mannion, Brian; Leen, Sean B.; Nash, Stephen; Science Foundation Ireland
    The emergence of tidal energy as a key renewable energy source requires the development of computational design models for accurate prediction of turbine performance and wake effects whilst also being computationally efficient. In this paper, we develop and validate a three-dimensional CFD model for vertical axis turbines, which achieves high accuracy. We also investigate the limitations of two-dimensional models and present a blockage correction for improved prediction. The two-dimensional blockage correction model is potentially attractive for preliminary design studies due to its computational advantage over three-dimensional models. Published by AIP Publishing.
  • Publication
    Review of the Higher Diploma in Systems Analysis
    (NUI Galway, 2008) Blake, Roger; Coughlan, Chris; Dempsey, Mary; Stengel, Dagmar; Duignan, Sean; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Evaluation of the Irish Productivity Centre Environmental Business Management (E.B.M) training programme
    (Human Factors Research Unit, University College Galway, 1994) Kelly, M.E.J.; Dempsey, Mary; |~|1267872|~|
    Under the EUROPEAN initative of the European Social Fund, the Irish Productivity Centre (IPC) identified a need for Environmental Business Management (E.B.M.) education and training for S.M.E.s. The relevance of E.B.M. to S.M.E.s, arises from (1) a recognition that without E.B.M. there would be a loss of market share or potential market openings, (2) the risk of the company being held liable for environmental damage caused by its processes and products thus jeopardising the future of the compamy, (3) the improvement in profitability measures and by exploiting market openings for environmentally sound products.
  • Publication
    Review of the Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA), National University of Ireland, Galway
    (NUI Galway, 2009-04-01) Wood, Geoff; Beech, Nic; Broder, Fergal; Dempsey, Mary; Boyd, Aoife; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Project management: learning manual for Master of Science (M.Sc.) Biomedical Science, NUI Galway
    (2007) Cormican, Kathryn; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Technology innovation and entrepreneurship: learning manual for the Diploma in Technology Commercialisation
    (Atlantic University Alliance, 2008) Cormican, Kathryn; |~|
    [No abstract available]
  • Publication
    Project management for engineers
    (National University of Ireland, Galway, 2016) Cormican, Kathryn; |~|
    In recent years we have witnessed a rapid growth in the use of project management methods and tools as a means by which organisations achieve their objectives. Projects drive business in industries as diverse as transportation, pharmaceuticals, banking, and hospitals etc. In the public sector, effective project management translates politicians' promises of new roads, schools and hospitals into solutions that improve everyday lives. Almost by definition, all innovation relies on project management. Irrespective of whether the innovation concerns a new product, or a new process, or indeed a contribution to pure science, better project management, on the whole, will see project outcomes better reached and deliverables better produced more quickly, cheaply and smartly. In light of this, planning, scheduling, budgeting and controlling are some of the key issues that need to be understood and practiced by organisations if their projects are to be implemented successfully. Project management is a means to an end and not an end in itself. The purpose of project management is to foresee or predict as many of the potential pitfalls and problems as soon as possible and to plan, organise and control activities so that the project is successfully completed in spite of any difficulties and risks encountered. The project management process starts before any resources are committed, and must continue until all the work is completed.