Publication

Hygrothermal deterioration in carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composite laminates aged in marine-based environment (degradation mechanism, mechanical and physicochemical properties)

Ghabezi, Pouyan
Harrison, Noel M.
Citation
Ghabezi, Pouyan, & Harrison, Noel M. (2022). Hygrothermal deterioration in carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composite laminates aged in marine-based environment (degradation mechanism, mechanical and physicochemical properties). Journal of Materials Science, 57(6), 4239-4254. doi:10.1007/s10853-022-06917-2
Abstract
One of the major challenges in off-shore tidal and wave energy devices is the ageing of these structures in the hostile marine environment, which limits their operating life. In this research, mechanical properties of aged glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy composite specimens including tensile strength, Youngâ s modulus, flexural strength, and shear strength, following immersion in a representative accelerated marine degradation environment (artificial seawater, with 3.5% salinity at room temperature and 60 °C) have been investigated. The microstructure and physicochemical characterization of the aged samples were assessed via microscopic imaging, micro-CT scanning and differential scanning calorimetry. The degradation phenomenon was apparent in the change of mechanical properties and microstructure of composite laminates (micro-cracks and debonding between matrix and fibre). Generally, the ageing process had a more severe effect on tensile and shear strengths of glass/epoxy samples than those of carbon/epoxy specimens. Reversely, the results of bending tests of carbon/epoxy composites showed more drop-in flexural properties than glass/epoxy samples. The results revealed that degradation mechanisms continue even after reaching the saturation point in composite materials. The achievements of this research present a good understanding of the effect of degradation of composite materials in salt water to deal with their application in real service environment.One of the major challenges in off-shore tidal and wave energy devices is the ageing of these structures in the hostile marine environment, which limits their operating life. In this research, mechanical properties of aged glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy composite specimens including tensile strength, Youngâ s modulus, flexural strength, and shear strength, following immersion in a representative accelerated marine degradation environment (artificial seawater, with 3.5% salinity at room temperature and 60 °C) have been investigated. The microstructure and physicochemical characterization of the aged samples were assessed via microscopic imaging, micro-CT scanning and differential scanning calorimetry. The degradation phenomenon was apparent in the change of mechanical properties and microstructure of composite laminates (micro-cracks and debonding between matrix and fibre). Generally, the ageing process had a more severe effect on tensile and shear strengths of glass/epoxy samples than those of carbon/epoxy specimens. Reversely, the results of bending tests of carbon/epoxy composites showed more drop-in flexural properties than glass/epoxy samples. The results revealed that degradation mechanisms continue even after reaching the saturation point in composite materials. The achievements of this research present a good understanding of the effect of degradation of composite materials in salt water to deal with their application in real service environment.
Funder
Publisher
Springer
Publisher DOI
10.1007/s10853-022-06917-2
Rights
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IE